Caring For Cut Glass

The American Cut Glass Association has a very informative website.   In addition to membership information there are tips on identifying cut glass, dating and patterns.

There are several free articles from past issues of their journal “The Hobstar”.  Among them are two articles by Vickie Matthews.

The Care and Cleaning of Cut Glass” has tips on handling, washing and displaying.  Since I’m located in an area prone to earthquakes, I especially like the suggestion of using a neutral wax or gel product sold at antique shops, hardware stores or on-line.   These products can be removed without harming the glass or signatures.

Packing and Shipping of Cut Glass” has tips on wrapping, boxing and using various shipping services.  Many of these tips can be used for transportation of glass, china or collectibles in general.

One of the best places to view cut glass in Southern California is the Historical Glass Museum in Redlands.   They have an entire room dedicated to American Cut Glass.  Located in a Victorian house, they have many other types of American made glass; the largest collection West of the Mississippi.  Check their website for upcoming lectures.

STRENGTH OF THE CALIFORNIA ART MARKET

Artfix Daily ran a good article titled “Four Reasons Why Historic Art Remains Important To The California Market” written by the editorial staff at William A. Karges Fine Art.

The major points discussed regarding Early California paintings (1870-1940) are:

  1. Traditional art is self-sustaining
  2. It preserves our (California) history
  3. Historical art preserves our environment
  4. The market is strong

To read the full article, see the following link at Art Fix Daily:

Strength of the California Art Market

 

FBI Warns Dealers, Collectors About Terrorist Loot

On Aug. 26th the following announcement was made:

The FBI is alerting art collectors and dealers to be particularly careful trading Near Eastern antiquities, warning that artifacts plundered by terrorist organizations such as ISIL are entering the marketplace.

“We now have credible reports that U.S. persons have been offered cultural property that appears to have been removed from Syria and Iraq recently,” said Bonnie Magness-Gardiner, manager of the FBI’s Art Theft Program.

The Bureau is asking U.S. art and antiquities market leaders to spread the word that preventing illegally obtained artifacts from reaching the market helps stem the transfer of funds to terrorists.

In a single-page document titled ISIL Antiquities Trafficking, the FBI asks leaders in the field to disseminate the following message:

  • Please be cautious when purchasing items from this region. Keep in mind that antiquities from Iraq remain subject to Office of Foreign Assets Control sanctions under the Iraq Stabilization and Insurgency Sanctions Regulations (31 CFR part 576).
  • Purchasing an object looted and/or sold by the Islamic State may provide financial support to a terrorist organization and could be prosecuted under 18 USC 233A.
  • Robust due diligence is necessary when purchasing any Syrian or Iraqi antiquities or other cultural property in the U.S. or when purchasing elsewhere using U.S. funds.

In February, the United Nations Security Council unanimously passed Resolution 2199, which obligates member states to take steps to prevent terrorist groups in Iraq and Syria from receiving donations and from benefiting from trade in oil, antiquities, and hostages.

Before purchasing an item from suspected areas, ask questions and verify:

  • Which country did this come from?
  • Do you have the proper paperwork?
  • What is the provenance or history of the object’s ownership?

Check stolen object databases.  Proceed with caution.  For the full article and links to important resources:  ISIL and Antiquities Trafficking

Collecting the Olympics

The fanfare, emotion and sports competition of the 2012 Olympics has passed.  Many collectors have found a way to extend the excitement year round by collecting Olympic memorabilia.  

You can start out inexpensively by collecting pins, coins, stamps and mascots from recent years.   Some collectors progress to a higher, more expensive level including medals and torches.  There’s something for every interest and budget.  To narrow down the choices begin collecting by category, year, country or sport.     

I have a modest Olympic collection of my own, and display many items in my office.  It started off when I worked at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles.   I was stationed at the USC Olympic Village where I was able to trade pins with the athletes and collect small souvenirs.  Over the years, I have added items from other olympics to my collection.  However, I realized that the pins I collected directly from the athletes in Los Angeles mean the most to me because of their personal connection.     

As an appraiser, one of the most exciting opportunities I’ve had was to appraise a silver award medal owned by an olympic athlete.   It was an insurance appraisal and it gave me the opportunity to examine the sales comparison approach (what similar items have sold for) versus the cost to reproduce the medal.   

If you still want a unique souvenir from the London Olympics, you can purchase something at the Official London 2012 Auction website.   They are auctioning off everything from game used equipment, to ceremony props and torches to help defer the cost of putting on the games.   

 

Appraiser of Olympics Memorabilia in California
Appraiser of Olympics Memorabilia in California

 

RESOURCES

Official website of the Olympic Movement

Olympic Collectibles and Collecting Olympic Memorabilia

Ingrid O’Neil Sports & Olympic Memorabilia

Olympin  – Olympic Collectors Club

Olympic Games Memorabilia and Collectibles

Top 10 Most Expensive Items of Olympic Memorabilia

 

 

Royal Oak Foundation lectures

 

The Royal Oak Foundation has scheduled a Spring lecture series of interest to appraisers, historians and Anglophiles in several cities throughout the U.S.  Some of the lecture titles include:

Westminster Abbey: A Place for Royal Celebration

“A Great Number of Useful Books”: The Country House Library

Resurrecting the English Country House

“Glorious Goodwood”: A House of Ducal Splendour

“A Work to Wonder At”: Stowe House and the American Revolution

Lectures are scheduled in the following cities:

Atlanta Boston & Ipswich Chicago Los Angeles Memphis New Orleans New York City Philadelphia San Diego San Francisco & Woodside Washington DC

For those not familiar with the foundation:

The Royal Oak Foundation engages Americans in the work of the National Trust of England, Wales and Northern Ireland ………  In the United States, Royal Oak offers a wide range of member programs and activities focused on the National Trust, British art and architecture, fine & decorative arts, gardens, history, as well as conservation and historic preservation.

For more details, brochure, cost and reservations, please visit The Royal Oak Foundation.

Sesquicentennial Renews Interest in Civil War Collectibles

Civil War Sesquicentenial

The 150th Anniversary of the American Civil War takes place this year and continues until 2015.  There are many state and local activities scheduled to commemorate this historical event.

Appraisers need to be aware of special events such as this, and how they will affect the values for related items.   This multi-year anniversary of such an important historical event is expected to have an increase on values for Civil War artifacts and collectibles, at least temporarily.  Buyers and appraisers should also be aware that civil war artifacts are frequently faked.

More information on the planned events is available at the following websites:

Civil War Trust  http://www.civilwar.org/150th-anniversary/

Smithsonian Institution http://www.civilwar150.si.edu/

The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/civil-war/

The National Civil War Museum

 

Top 10: Ten of the biggest auction sales of historic U.S. Civil War memorabilia

(source: Wikicollecting)